Super Bowl 2020: Extremity In The Name Of Culture?

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After a great game of an outstanding comeback by Kansas City Chiefs (Vs San Francisco 49ers) in Super Bowl LIV, the crowd seemed to be inclined towards debating a rather isolated issue than the game itself: Was the halftime performance by Hollywood’s beloved superstars Shakira and Jennifer Lopez obscene?

The two set the stage on fire and how! (Although, this might seem to have contradicted the opinion of the majority)

What the audience found and I quote “terribly disturbing”:

The broadcast featured the two stars in costumes showcasing their buttocks, pole dancing and grabbing their crotch multiple times on stage- all interpreted as ruthless objectification of women by two of the most influential women in the world. 

A famous reporter of the Golf Channel even went ahead and tweeted: “Stop dancing on a stripper pole on the biggest stage and then complain about how often we get sexualised.. The hypocrisy of wanting to not be seen as sex symbols but then wearing outfits and choosing overtly sexual choreography has me very confused” 

An audience full of young parents on the other hand had their own issues with regard to how something like THE Super Bowl, an event supposedly aired for all age groups to enjoy could have a performance such as this as if it were the 'new normal’.

The halftime show featuring Shakira and Jennifer Lopez seemed to garner more buzz than the game itself. (What!?) At some point, little children were showcased in cages- all seen as a political statement about President Trump’s immigration policy - but the whole pole dancing and stimulated sex gestures were viewed as most offensive. 

Prolife advocate Abby Johnson tweeted, “On the day of the highest rate of sex trafficking, the NFL says, ‘Hey, let’s have two women dance half naked and get a bunch of zoomed in crotch shots of them. That’s female empowerment!’ Do they have no clue that they just contributed to the commodification of women?” Even though a lot of folks said they loved the energy and called the two Latina’s performances “historic”, the popular opinion seems to have been this: misrepresentation of an entire culture on one of the biggest stages airing worldwide.  

The performance might have not appeared to be “family friendly” to a few but did it deserve a statement as harsh as “This exhibition was Pepsi showing young girls that sexual exploitation of women is OK”?



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